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"Do not say that I’ll depart tomorrow
because even today I still arrive.
Look at me: I arrive in every second
to be a bud on a spring branch,
to be a tiny bird whose wings are still fragile,
learning to sing in my new nest,
to be a caterpillar in the heart of a flower,
to be a jewel hiding itself in a stone."

— Thich Nhat Hanh

(Source: ashramof1)

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Esalen retreat, mindfulness meditation, Buddhism at Big Sur, 2013

Esalen retreat, mindfulness meditation, Buddhism at Big Sur, 2013

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When you realize how perfect everything is you will tilt your head back and laugh at the sky.  ~Buddha

When you realize how perfect everything is you will tilt your head back and laugh at the sky.  ~Buddha

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spirit rock meditation retreat, during a moment of reflection on the path.

spirit rock meditation retreat, during a moment of reflection on the path.

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I have come to see meditation as a radical act of love, an inward gesture of benevolence and kindness toward ourselves and toward others, a gesture of the heart that recognizes our perfection even in our obvious imperfection, with all our shortcomings, our wounds, our attachments, our vexations, and our persistent habits of unawareness.—Jon Kabat-Zinn

I have come to see meditation as a radical act of love, an inward gesture of benevolence and kindness toward ourselves and toward others, a gesture of the heart that recognizes our perfection even in our obvious imperfection, with all our shortcomings, our wounds, our attachments, our vexations, and our persistent habits of unawareness.
—Jon Kabat-Zinn

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Nature reclaims a bench at Spirit Rock meditation retreat

Nature reclaims a bench at Spirit Rock meditation retreat

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Others are my main concern. When I notice something of mine, I steal it and give it to others.—Shantideva

Others are my main concern. When I notice something of mine, I steal it and give it to others.
—Shantideva

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If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation. —Chuang Tzu

If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.
Chuang Tzu

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Buddha in the forest at Spirit Rock
At certain times, a silent mind is very important, but ‘silent’ does not mean closed. The silent mind is an alert, awakened mind; a mind seeking the nature of reality. —Lama Yeshe

Buddha in the forest at Spirit Rock

At certain times, a silent mind is very important, but ‘silent’ does not mean closed. The silent mind is an alert, awakened mind; a mind seeking the nature of reality.
—Lama Yeshe

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Buddha, prayer over water at Spirit Rock meditation retreat.

Buddha, prayer over water at Spirit Rock meditation retreat.

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Buddha, at Spirit Rock meditation retreat, along a forested pathway.

Buddha, at Spirit Rock meditation retreat, along a forested pathway.

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Buddha, at Spirit Rock

Buddha, at Spirit Rock

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There is a spark of hope, a playful humor about the posture we take in meditation, which lies in the secret understanding that we all have the Buddha nature. So when you assume this posture, you are playfully imitating a Buddha, acknowledging and giving real encouragement to the emergence of your own Buddha nature. You begin to respect yourself as a potential Buddha. At the same time, you still recognize your relative condition. But because you have let yourself be inspired by a joyful trust in your own true Buddha nature, you can accept your negative aspects more easily and deal with them more generously and with more humor. When you meditate, invite yourself to feel the self-esteem, the dignity, and the strong humility of the Buddha that you are. If you simply let yourself be inspired by this joyful trust, it is enough: Out of this understanding and confidence, meditation will naturally arise.—Sogyal Rinpoche, from Glimpse of the Day

There is a spark of hope, a playful humor about the posture we take in meditation, which lies in the secret understanding that we all have the Buddha nature. So when you assume this posture, you are playfully imitating a Buddha, acknowledging and giving real encouragement to the emergence of your own Buddha nature. You begin to respect yourself as a potential Buddha. At the same time, you still recognize your relative condition. But because you have let yourself be inspired by a joyful trust in your own true Buddha nature, you can accept your negative aspects more easily and deal with them more generously and with more humor.
When you meditate, invite yourself to feel the self-esteem, the dignity, and the strong humility of the Buddha that you are. If you simply let yourself be inspired by this joyful trust, it is enough: Out of this understanding and confidence, meditation will naturally arise.
—Sogyal Rinpoche, from Glimpse of the Day

Quote
"Everything changes, nothing remains without change."

— The Buddha