Quote
"This is the shamanic dance in the waterfall. This is how magic is done. Its done by hurling yourself into the abyss and discovering that its a feather bed."

— Terence Mckenna (via panatmansam)

Quote
"Keep walking, though there’s no place to get to. Don’t try to see through the distances. That’s not for human beings. Move within, but don’t move the way fear makes you move."

— Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī (via thecalminside)

(via panatmansam)

Photo
allthingseurope:

Glencar. Ireland (by Sean Mac Thomas)
Quote
"“The basic laws of the Universe are simple, but because our senses are limited, we can’t grasp them. There is a pattern in creation. Science is never finished because the human mind only uses a small portion of its capacity, and man’s exploration of his world is also limited. If we look at this tree outside whose roots search beneath the pavement for water, or a flower which sends its sweet smell to the pollinating bees, or even our own selves and the inner forces that drive us to act, we can see that we all dance to a mysterious tune, and the piper who plays this melody from an inscrutable distance—whatever name we give him—Creative Force, or God—escapes all book knowledge.”

- Albert Einstein"

http://ift.tt/1n60BKI (via painting-a-picture)

(via theremustbeabetterway)

Text

La Causa y Cesar Chavez

Forty years ago I parked my car out front a liquor store in San Jose to buy a soft drink when a young waif of a woman carrying a red flag with a black eagle in a circle of white asked me not to go inside. I asked why. She said it would help farm workers fighting for justice because the store carried a brand of wine from a company that was fighting workers’ efforts to join the United Farm Workers Union. The encounter would change my life and draw me from college to spend about two years working for Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers. Now four decades have passed, and we see a new film about Chavez and the struggle, la lucha.
The union was far from perfect and so was Chavez, and maybe the film overlooks, or looks past, that reality. Still, I am heartened to see the honoring of a movement that changed so many lives, way beyond matters of the union, to more personal matters of the heart, of dignity, of nonviolence, of equality, and awareness in so many areas, from gender to race, to class, and eventually coming to accept anger, forgiveness, and imperfections in ourselves, all of us. Go see the film, read the critical books, and when you get a chance, talk to the farm workers and organizers who met, worked with and knew this many-faceted man and the movement he helped inspire. Today, I re-posted a few old photos and reflections about my tiny little sliver of involvement in that movement, a time that remains indelible, Que viva la lucha, Que viva el sueno.

Photo
catwriter:

Back in the day…the United Farm Workers led various boycotts—against Gallo wine, against table grapes, against head lettuce, against supermarket chains, depending on various struggles for union contracts in the fields. This sign from about 1974, probably from the cafeteria at West Valley College in Saratoga, California, showed the kind of solidarity that once existed between a community and the people who harvest our fruits and vegetables. As we used to say, “Que viva la lucha! Que viva la huelga!”
(y que pasa hoy?)

catwriter:

Back in the day…the United Farm Workers led various boycotts—against Gallo wine, against table grapes, against head lettuce, against supermarket chains, depending on various struggles for union contracts in the fields. This sign from about 1974, probably from the cafeteria at West Valley College in Saratoga, California, showed the kind of solidarity that once existed between a community and the people who harvest our fruits and vegetables. As we used to say, “Que viva la lucha! Que viva la huelga!”

(y que pasa hoy?)

Photo
catwriter:

UFW March on Gallo, San Francisco to Modesto, some 100 plus miles on the back roads and highways, 1975.
Father Bill O’Donnell, longtime civil rights activist and friend of the United Farm Workers and many other causes for human rights and justice, and a priest at St. Joseph the Worker in Berkeley for many years, is in the upper right, carrying a cross and banner, his shirt streaming UFW ribbons, during the March on Gallo, which rallied thousands of people for a gathering with Cesar Chavez and Joan Baez in Modesto during the boycott against Gallo wine. We started the march in San Francisco, and I hitched a ride across the Bay Bridge with Fred Ross Jr., son of the legendary organizer Fred Ross Sr. who “discovered” Cesar Chavez in San Jose many years earlier. After the first few miles with the group, I returned to school at West Valley College in Saratoga. But I couldn’t stay away, catching rides out to the marchers in the afternoons and then returning home at night. By the time the marchers reached the valley, I had quit school and joined the last few days of the march. It wasn’t long before I’d joined up full-time, thanks to the amazing human justice and spiritual essence of Lynn Campbell, who had left Stanford for the UFW earlier and later went on to organize for women’s rights in New York. The march on Gallo was the catalyst for the next two years of my life as a community organizer for the union, where I experienced and learned more than I could ever put into words, the good and the bad and all the in-between, but mainly I learned about the dignity we share as human beings, the dignity we all deserve, particularly those who have been judged to the be the last, who shall be first. Many, including O’Donnell, Ross Sr., and Campbell, are gone now, but their essence lives on in the hearts of every justice worker who carries on their work today.

catwriter:

UFW March on Gallo, San Francisco to Modesto, some 100 plus miles on the back roads and highways, 1975.

Father Bill O’Donnell, longtime civil rights activist and friend of the United Farm Workers and many other causes for human rights and justice, and a priest at St. Joseph the Worker in Berkeley for many years, is in the upper right, carrying a cross and banner, his shirt streaming UFW ribbons, during the March on Gallo, which rallied thousands of people for a gathering with Cesar Chavez and Joan Baez in Modesto during the boycott against Gallo wine. We started the march in San Francisco, and I hitched a ride across the Bay Bridge with Fred Ross Jr., son of the legendary organizer Fred Ross Sr. who “discovered” Cesar Chavez in San Jose many years earlier. After the first few miles with the group, I returned to school at West Valley College in Saratoga. But I couldn’t stay away, catching rides out to the marchers in the afternoons and then returning home at night. By the time the marchers reached the valley, I had quit school and joined the last few days of the march. It wasn’t long before I’d joined up full-time, thanks to the amazing human justice and spiritual essence of Lynn Campbell, who had left Stanford for the UFW earlier and later went on to organize for women’s rights in New York. The march on Gallo was the catalyst for the next two years of my life as a community organizer for the union, where I experienced and learned more than I could ever put into words, the good and the bad and all the in-between, but mainly I learned about the dignity we share as human beings, the dignity we all deserve, particularly those who have been judged to the be the last, who shall be first. Many, including O’Donnell, Ross Sr., and Campbell, are gone now, but their essence lives on in the hearts of every justice worker who carries on their work today.

Photo
catwriter:

The United Farm Workers Oakland Boycott House, 1975
We boycotted grapes, lettuce, supermarkets that wouldn’t comply.We carried boycott banners on street corners and the UFW flagWith it’s black eagle and red field, known everywhere back then.We trained in nonviolent action, held house meetings, marched forThe rights of farm workers to earn a fair wage, to join unions, toOrganize for justice. We were imperfect for sure, but we believed.Most of the time we slept three or four hours a night or even less.We went into the fields to support the workers, allied ourselves withMost social and human justice causes of the time. Our group livedIn one of the worst parts of Oakland, earning five dollars a week plusRoom and board. Cesar Chavez would loan us out for causes andPeople he supported. Off to Oregon we’d go on a moment’s notice toCampaign for Jerry Brown when he ran for president as a write-inCandidate there in 1976. We ran Tom Hayden’s campaign for U.SSenate in San Jose. Sometimes, I’d finish for the day and showerAt 5 a.m., get dressed, climb into bed, sleep for a half hour and startAll over again. It went that way, the dedication of students who leftStanford University and San Jose State and other places, of nuns andPriests and ministers and social workers and radicals and dreamers.It was the time of my life I lived, where I learned about marijuana,Met my first gay friends, learned to call “girls” women, and see peopleAs humans, whether they were poor, whether they were a different Color, whether they smelled like the earth. We stood our ground whenPeople who didn’t understand us threatened to beat us; we resistedNonviolently, and sometimes they would back off, tears in their eyes.In the end we all went our own ways, and much has been writtenAbout what went wrong with Cesar Chavez and the UFW during That time, but I’m not writing and posting tonight to talk about that.We grew up and learned what it is to walk together, hand-in-hand, People of all colors, backgrounds, sexual orientations, political beliefs.We were rich students and poor workers, atheists and Christians ofAll mixtures and persuasions, all joined together for a cause beyond Ourselves. Years later, when Chavez died, I was a newspaper reporterAnd traveled to cover his funeral in Delano, where old boycott friendsWho still lived came together, most of us for the last time. There we Joined hands, laughed and cried, and marched again behind the flagAnd the coffin, not so much for a reality that never came to be butFor a dream that lives yet in our hearts, y por la causa, si se puede!  

catwriter:

The United Farm Workers Oakland Boycott House, 1975

We boycotted grapes, lettuce, supermarkets that wouldn’t comply.
We carried boycott banners on street corners and the UFW flag
With it’s black eagle and red field, known everywhere back then.
We trained in nonviolent action, held house meetings, marched for
The rights of farm workers to earn a fair wage, to join unions, to
Organize for justice. We were imperfect for sure, but we believed.
Most of the time we slept three or four hours a night or even less.
We went into the fields to support the workers, allied ourselves with
Most social and human justice causes of the time. Our group lived
In one of the worst parts of Oakland, earning five dollars a week plus
Room and board. Cesar Chavez would loan us out for causes and
People he supported. Off to Oregon we’d go on a moment’s notice to
Campaign for Jerry Brown when he ran for president as a write-in
Candidate there in 1976. We ran Tom Hayden’s campaign for U.S
Senate in San Jose. Sometimes, I’d finish for the day and shower
At 5 a.m., get dressed, climb into bed, sleep for a half hour and start
All over again. It went that way, the dedication of students who left
Stanford University and San Jose State and other places, of nuns and
Priests and ministers and social workers and radicals and dreamers.
It was the time of my life I lived, where I learned about marijuana,
Met my first gay friends, learned to call “girls” women, and see people
As humans, whether they were poor, whether they were a different
Color, whether they smelled like the earth. We stood our ground when
People who didn’t understand us threatened to beat us; we resisted
Nonviolently, and sometimes they would back off, tears in their eyes.
In the end we all went our own ways, and much has been written
About what went wrong with Cesar Chavez and the UFW during
That time, but I’m not writing and posting tonight to talk about that.
We grew up and learned what it is to walk together, hand-in-hand,
People of all colors, backgrounds, sexual orientations, political beliefs.
We were rich students and poor workers, atheists and Christians of
All mixtures and persuasions, all joined together for a cause beyond
Ourselves. Years later, when Chavez died, I was a newspaper reporter
And traveled to cover his funeral in Delano, where old boycott friends
Who still lived came together, most of us for the last time. There we
Joined hands, laughed and cried, and marched again behind the flag
And the coffin, not so much for a reality that never came to be but
For a dream that lives yet in our hearts, y por la causa, si se puede!  

Photo
catwriter:

Cesar Chavez and U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy, in California, circa mid-1960s
"Robert didn’t come to us and tell us what was good for us," said Dolores Huerta, a co-founder of the United Farm Workers. "He came to us and asked us two questions: ‘What do you want? And how can I help?’ That’s why we loved him."

catwriter:

Cesar Chavez and U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy, in California, circa mid-1960s

"Robert didn’t come to us and tell us what was good for us," said Dolores Huerta, a co-founder of the United Farm Workers. "He came to us and asked us two questions: ‘What do you want? And how can I help?’ That’s why we loved him."

Text

cold amber moon

I can’t imagine…
I can’t imagine we share the same sand
Or see the same friends on different days.

I can’t imagine you haven’t moved to a new shore
Where the drum and the harp make music
Beyond words.

Like that mindless spider
Washed from the water spout
Who climbs again as the teardrops roll,
Looking within for love from without,
Yet not ready to let that nothing go.

No nursery rhyme ever called for this much courage
Or stupidity.

Photoset

The puzzle queen—horses, mermaids, boars, whales, sunshine, forest, and undersea wonders come alive, piece by piece, at the hands of my daughter.

Photo
the palms and the flowers, late afternoon, Huntington Gardens

the palms and the flowers, late afternoon, Huntington Gardens

Photo
The blossoms of trees, Huntington Gardens, California

The blossoms of trees, Huntington Gardens, California

Photo
The blossom pathway, Huntington Gardens 

The blossom pathway, Huntington Gardens 

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the cherry blossoms at Huntington Gardens…

the cherry blossoms at Huntington Gardens…