Photoset

Refuge of trees

Quote
"To regret one’s own experiences is to arrest one’s own development. To deny one’s own experiences is to put a lie into the lips of one’s own life. It is no less than a denial of the soul."

— Oscar Wilde, De Profundis (via panatmansam)

Photo
neurosciencestuff:

Only 25 Minutes of Mindfulness Meditation Alleviates Stress
Mindfulness meditation has become an increasingly popular way for people to improve their mental and physical health, yet most research supporting its benefits has focused on lengthy, weeks-long training programs.
New research from Carnegie Mellon University is the first to show that brief mindfulness meditation practice — 25 minutes for three consecutive days — alleviates psychological stress. Published in the journal “Psychoneuroendocrinology,” the study investigates how mindfulness meditation affects people’s ability to be resilient under stress.
"More and more people report using meditation practices for stress reduction, but we know very little about how much you need to do for stress reduction and health benefits," said lead author J. David Creswell, associate professor of psychology in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.
For the study, Creswell and his research team had 66 healthy individuals aged 18-30 years old participate in a three-day experiment. Some participants went through a brief mindfulness meditation training program; for 25 minutes for three consecutive days, the individuals were given breathing exercises to help them monitor their breath and pay attention to their present moment experiences. A second group of participants completed a matched three-day cognitive training program in which they were asked to critically analyze poetry in an effort to enhance problem-solving skills.
Following the final training activity, all participants were asked to complete stressful speech and math tasks in front of stern-faced evaluators. Each individual reported their stress levels in response to stressful speech and math performance stress tasks, and provided saliva samples for measurement of cortisol, commonly referred to as the stress hormone.
The participants who received the brief mindfulness meditation training reported reduced stress perceptions to the speech and math tasks, indicating that the mindfulness meditation fostered psychological stress resilience. More interestingly, on the biological side, the mindfulness meditation participants showed greater cortisol reactivity.
"When you initially learn mindfulness mediation practices, you have to cognitively work at it — especially during a stressful task," said Creswell. "And, these active cognitive efforts may result in the task feeling less stressful, but they may also have physiological costs with higher cortisol production."
Creswell’s group is now testing the possibility that mindfulness can become more automatic and easy to use with long-term mindfulness meditation training, which may result in reduced cortisol reactivity.

neurosciencestuff:

Only 25 Minutes of Mindfulness Meditation Alleviates Stress

Mindfulness meditation has become an increasingly popular way for people to improve their mental and physical health, yet most research supporting its benefits has focused on lengthy, weeks-long training programs.

New research from Carnegie Mellon University is the first to show that brief mindfulness meditation practice — 25 minutes for three consecutive days — alleviates psychological stress. Published in the journal “Psychoneuroendocrinology,” the study investigates how mindfulness meditation affects people’s ability to be resilient under stress.

"More and more people report using meditation practices for stress reduction, but we know very little about how much you need to do for stress reduction and health benefits," said lead author J. David Creswell, associate professor of psychology in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

For the study, Creswell and his research team had 66 healthy individuals aged 18-30 years old participate in a three-day experiment. Some participants went through a brief mindfulness meditation training program; for 25 minutes for three consecutive days, the individuals were given breathing exercises to help them monitor their breath and pay attention to their present moment experiences. A second group of participants completed a matched three-day cognitive training program in which they were asked to critically analyze poetry in an effort to enhance problem-solving skills.

Following the final training activity, all participants were asked to complete stressful speech and math tasks in front of stern-faced evaluators. Each individual reported their stress levels in response to stressful speech and math performance stress tasks, and provided saliva samples for measurement of cortisol, commonly referred to as the stress hormone.

The participants who received the brief mindfulness meditation training reported reduced stress perceptions to the speech and math tasks, indicating that the mindfulness meditation fostered psychological stress resilience. More interestingly, on the biological side, the mindfulness meditation participants showed greater cortisol reactivity.

"When you initially learn mindfulness mediation practices, you have to cognitively work at it — especially during a stressful task," said Creswell. "And, these active cognitive efforts may result in the task feeling less stressful, but they may also have physiological costs with higher cortisol production."

Creswell’s group is now testing the possibility that mindfulness can become more automatic and easy to use with long-term mindfulness meditation training, which may result in reduced cortisol reactivity.

(via mindmyquiet)

Quote
"The great benefit of science is that it can make a tremendous contribution to the alleviation of suffering on a physical level, but it is only by cultivating the qualities of the human heart and transforming our attitudes that we can begin to address and overcome our mental suffering. We need both, since the alleviation of suffering must take place on both a physical and a psychological level."

— His Holiness the XIVth Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso

(Source: panatmansam)

Quote
"Around us, life bursts with miracles—a glass of water, a ray of sunshine, a leaf, a caterpillar, a flower, laughter, raindrops..
If you live in awareness, it is easy to see miracles everywhere.
Each human being is a multiplicity of miracles; Eyes that see thousands of colors, shapes, and forms; ears that hear a bee flying or a thunderclap; a brain that ponders a speck of dust as easily as the entire cosmos; a heart that beats in rhythm with the heartbeat of all beings.
When we are tired and feel discouraged by life’s daily struggles, we may not notice these miracles, but they are always there."

— Thích Nhất Hạnh (via panatmansam)

Photo
meditationsinwonderland:

ॐ my spiritual Wonderland ॐ
Quote
"Has it ever struck you that life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quick you hardly catch it going?"

The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore by Tennessee Williams  (via seulray)

(Source: catharinethegreat, via beherenowandzen)

Quote
"The Pueblo Indians told me that all Americans are crazy, and of course I was somewhat astonished and asked them why. They said, “Well, they say they think in their heads. No sound man thinks in his head. We think in the heart."

— Carl Jung

(Source: abiding-in-peace, via beherenowandzen)

Quote
"This is the shamanic dance in the waterfall. This is how magic is done. Its done by hurling yourself into the abyss and discovering that its a feather bed."

— Terence Mckenna (via panatmansam)

Quote
"Keep walking, though there’s no place to get to. Don’t try to see through the distances. That’s not for human beings. Move within, but don’t move the way fear makes you move."

— Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī (via thecalminside)

(via panatmansam)

Photo
allthingseurope:

Glencar. Ireland (by Sean Mac Thomas)
Quote
"“The basic laws of the Universe are simple, but because our senses are limited, we can’t grasp them. There is a pattern in creation. Science is never finished because the human mind only uses a small portion of its capacity, and man’s exploration of his world is also limited. If we look at this tree outside whose roots search beneath the pavement for water, or a flower which sends its sweet smell to the pollinating bees, or even our own selves and the inner forces that drive us to act, we can see that we all dance to a mysterious tune, and the piper who plays this melody from an inscrutable distance—whatever name we give him—Creative Force, or God—escapes all book knowledge.”

- Albert Einstein"

http://ift.tt/1n60BKI (via painting-a-picture)

(via theremustbeabetterway)

Text

La Causa y Cesar Chavez

Forty years ago I parked my car out front a liquor store in San Jose to buy a soft drink when a young waif of a woman carrying a red flag with a black eagle in a circle of white asked me not to go inside. I asked why. She said it would help farm workers fighting for justice because the store carried a brand of wine from a company that was fighting workers’ efforts to join the United Farm Workers Union. The encounter would change my life and draw me from college to spend about two years working for Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers. Now four decades have passed, and we see a new film about Chavez and the struggle, la lucha.
The union was far from perfect and so was Chavez, and maybe the film overlooks, or looks past, that reality. Still, I am heartened to see the honoring of a movement that changed so many lives, way beyond matters of the union, to more personal matters of the heart, of dignity, of nonviolence, of equality, and awareness in so many areas, from gender to race, to class, and eventually coming to accept anger, forgiveness, and imperfections in ourselves, all of us. Go see the film, read the critical books, and when you get a chance, talk to the farm workers and organizers who met, worked with and knew this many-faceted man and the movement he helped inspire. Today, I re-posted a few old photos and reflections about my tiny little sliver of involvement in that movement, a time that remains indelible, Que viva la lucha, Que viva el sueno.

Photo
catwriter:

Back in the day…the United Farm Workers led various boycotts—against Gallo wine, against table grapes, against head lettuce, against supermarket chains, depending on various struggles for union contracts in the fields. This sign from about 1974, probably from the cafeteria at West Valley College in Saratoga, California, showed the kind of solidarity that once existed between a community and the people who harvest our fruits and vegetables. As we used to say, “Que viva la lucha! Que viva la huelga!”
(y que pasa hoy?)

catwriter:

Back in the day…the United Farm Workers led various boycotts—against Gallo wine, against table grapes, against head lettuce, against supermarket chains, depending on various struggles for union contracts in the fields. This sign from about 1974, probably from the cafeteria at West Valley College in Saratoga, California, showed the kind of solidarity that once existed between a community and the people who harvest our fruits and vegetables. As we used to say, “Que viva la lucha! Que viva la huelga!”

(y que pasa hoy?)

Photo
catwriter:

UFW March on Gallo, San Francisco to Modesto, some 100 plus miles on the back roads and highways, 1975.
Father Bill O’Donnell, longtime civil rights activist and friend of the United Farm Workers and many other causes for human rights and justice, and a priest at St. Joseph the Worker in Berkeley for many years, is in the upper right, carrying a cross and banner, his shirt streaming UFW ribbons, during the March on Gallo, which rallied thousands of people for a gathering with Cesar Chavez and Joan Baez in Modesto during the boycott against Gallo wine. We started the march in San Francisco, and I hitched a ride across the Bay Bridge with Fred Ross Jr., son of the legendary organizer Fred Ross Sr. who “discovered” Cesar Chavez in San Jose many years earlier. After the first few miles with the group, I returned to school at West Valley College in Saratoga. But I couldn’t stay away, catching rides out to the marchers in the afternoons and then returning home at night. By the time the marchers reached the valley, I had quit school and joined the last few days of the march. It wasn’t long before I’d joined up full-time, thanks to the amazing human justice and spiritual essence of Lynn Campbell, who had left Stanford for the UFW earlier and later went on to organize for women’s rights in New York. The march on Gallo was the catalyst for the next two years of my life as a community organizer for the union, where I experienced and learned more than I could ever put into words, the good and the bad and all the in-between, but mainly I learned about the dignity we share as human beings, the dignity we all deserve, particularly those who have been judged to the be the last, who shall be first. Many, including O’Donnell, Ross Sr., and Campbell, are gone now, but their essence lives on in the hearts of every justice worker who carries on their work today.

catwriter:

UFW March on Gallo, San Francisco to Modesto, some 100 plus miles on the back roads and highways, 1975.

Father Bill O’Donnell, longtime civil rights activist and friend of the United Farm Workers and many other causes for human rights and justice, and a priest at St. Joseph the Worker in Berkeley for many years, is in the upper right, carrying a cross and banner, his shirt streaming UFW ribbons, during the March on Gallo, which rallied thousands of people for a gathering with Cesar Chavez and Joan Baez in Modesto during the boycott against Gallo wine. We started the march in San Francisco, and I hitched a ride across the Bay Bridge with Fred Ross Jr., son of the legendary organizer Fred Ross Sr. who “discovered” Cesar Chavez in San Jose many years earlier. After the first few miles with the group, I returned to school at West Valley College in Saratoga. But I couldn’t stay away, catching rides out to the marchers in the afternoons and then returning home at night. By the time the marchers reached the valley, I had quit school and joined the last few days of the march. It wasn’t long before I’d joined up full-time, thanks to the amazing human justice and spiritual essence of Lynn Campbell, who had left Stanford for the UFW earlier and later went on to organize for women’s rights in New York. The march on Gallo was the catalyst for the next two years of my life as a community organizer for the union, where I experienced and learned more than I could ever put into words, the good and the bad and all the in-between, but mainly I learned about the dignity we share as human beings, the dignity we all deserve, particularly those who have been judged to the be the last, who shall be first. Many, including O’Donnell, Ross Sr., and Campbell, are gone now, but their essence lives on in the hearts of every justice worker who carries on their work today.